8.25.2007

Poll Results: No Names By A Nose

While most of you (a full 50 percent) don't care if a server gives a name when you're eating out, those of you who do care seem to feel pretty strongly about the issue. (See original post here.)

Of voters who had an opinion, 28 percent preferred to leave names out of the dining experience, while 20 percent like the server to give his or her name.

An anonymous commenter writes that servers giving their names is "so pointless, and hints of eating at a T.G. McFunster's Family Food Bag chain. How much 'flair' are they required to sport before getting on a first name basis with me? Are we to be friends now? Will he/she stay in touch after the meal?"

Hoogrrl echoes that sentiment and writes: "When I go out for a meal with someone, I am usually at the restaurant to be with the person I came with. I didn't come there to make friends with the server. Therefore, personal information is just not necessary. This is a huge personal peeve, about which I have railed for a long time."

On the flip side of the coin, another anonymous commenter says that giving a name "is about ownership and accountability. If you gave great service, I know who to ask for next time and who to give credit to when I get good service."

Thanks to all who voted and left thoughts in the comment section. Any restaurant owners out there care to reveal your policy now that you know where a (small and unscientific) blog sample stands?

3 comments:

Chip Griffin said...

I don't understand the mindset that having a (minimal) relationship with your server somehow disrupts the evening. To the contrary, while I don't feel compelled to get so friendly with my server that I feel like we need an extra seat at the table, the fine dining industry is about service and ultimately service is about relationships.

If you are in a business meeting with someone, do you not introduce yourself to the other participants even if you don't expect to talk much after the meeting?

Building a relationship with your server improves your experience because humans tend to respond better when they have made some sort of connection.

Michael said...

remember when it was cool for the server, your new best friend, to kneel beside the table and get intimate with their new best friends ... usually they had to balance themselves by holding onto to the table's edge ... all I can remember is the dude with the dirty fingernails ... bring me another drink.

ljt said...

I had no idea people were so passionate about this - didn't even realize it was an issue until the poll! So is it just me, or is it not easier to address a server by name rather than pronoun, especially if you need to call the server's attention?