1.10.2008

BYOB Takes On New Meaning

Do you BYOB — bring your own bag — when you go to the store or farmers market?

If you're looking for reusable bags that make a statement, Bon Appetit's blog points out BYOB, a Canadian company producing a sharp collection of eco and fashion conscious totes. I like their not-so-subtle "Cheeky" bag, pictured above (about $30).

Last summer, the craze over designer Anya Hindmarch's I'm Not A Plastic Bag helped put the plastic bag problem on the map. I've acquired a collection of freebie reusable bags from spots like the Garden District (with a purchase) and Whole Foods (always available to purchase), and I use paper grocery bags to put out the recycling at home.

What's your preference? Paper, reusable or *gasp* plastic?

14 comments:

bon mariage said...

I didn't know you could pick them up at the Garden District - I'll have to check it out :)

Amanda said...

Let me clarify that point so I don't start rumors! When you buy something at Garden District they sometimes have these cool, mesh-like green bags that work well for shopping trips.

Catherine said...

there really is no environmental difference from paper/plastic: see this recent washingtonpost.com story:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/graphic/2007/10/03/GR2007100301385.html?hpid=smartliving

plus, plastic bags are easily recyclable for those of us with dogs. reusable, although, is clearly best.

Catherine said...

sorry link didn't seem to post:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/
graphic/2007/10/03/GR2007100301385.html?hpid
=smartliving

Amanda said...

They did a great job with that graphic, and you're right about the evils of both. It's all about reducing consumption.

In addition to pooper-scooper qualities, I bet people come up with some creative ways to reuse plastic bags. I read a tip once to pack them into the bottom of large planters so you don't have to use so much dirt and make the pot weigh a ton.

Anthony said...

And don't forget that Whole Foods gives you 5 cents back when you use your own bag!

julie said...

i'm a reusable bag girl myself. i have some envirosax (http://usa.envirosax.com/index.php) that you can get from greater goods - i love them because i can roll them up and pop one easily into my bag, and they're colorfully fun.

Amanda said...

Julie: Very cute bags! Thanks for the link.

Anonymous said...

I have reusable bags from just about every store in town -- including Giant, Trader Joe's, Whole Foods and Mom's Organic Market. The Giant bags are the most durable and can handle a lot of reuse (I have had my trusty green ones for 10 years, and just bought one of the new blue ones as well) But the Whole Foods are more attractive.

Anonymous said...

the problem i personally have with reusable bags are that i ALWAYS forget to bring them into the store with me.

but...i always reuse my paper and plastic bags...and i really like the simplehuman plastic bag organizer: http://www.simplehuman.com/
products/grocery-bag-holders/index.html

The Humble Gourmand said...

I've got one of those neon green Garden District bags, too, and they're awesome for shopping trips. (I think they give them out with big purchases, as I got mine when stocking up on planters and soil a few years back.)

I also find myself using an old, extra-large LL Bean boat-and-tote bag a lot. It's really sturdy for heavy groceries!

Olesh said...

Plastic bags serve other purposes too. For instance, I have not bought a garbage bag in 6 years.

I think being aware of waste is more important than how many uses you can find for a groery receptacle.

Mr T in DC said...

I always forget to bring the reusable bags to the grocery store, too, but my main problem with them is the handles are too long, and since I'm short they almost drag on the ground. I have to hold them up, which gets tiring after awhile. The Giant grocery ones, blue mesh, are best for me because they have short handles.

Amanda said...

You could always walk home doing bicep curls. ; )

Saw Whole Foods has some snazzy new waterproof bags hanging from the credit card machines.