2.24.2009

Tips For Food Photos

A Cacao Tree chocolate, shot with a point-and-shoot camera
Metrocurean photo

We food people have been to known to whip out cameras at odd times. After all, how could you take a bite of that beautiful dish without documenting it for posterity first? If you fall into this slightly crazed category, check out my tips for great food photos over on Kelly DiNardo's Amuse Bouche blog. And here's a link to some of my favorite photos I've coaxed out of a point-and-shoot camera.

5 comments:

Dskco said...

It was during the lunch rush when I began taking pics of my sushi dish and my friends. The next table over laughed and asked me if I was taking pictures in case I got hungry later and wanted to remember the food. Haha, Yes us bloggers look crazy whipping out our camera all the time, but whatever!

iEatDC said...

I'm going to have to disagree with Ms. DiNardo on one point, but it's definitely up to personal opinion--if I had the choice of no picture, or sort of weird cell phone picture, I'd choose the latter. I like to know what the food is going to look like. Half of the time I order things that go by our table and may look more interesting than they sound on paper. Or maybe the description in the menu is non-existent. But I guess that's part of what makes you all a little more classy :)

Amanda said...

Those are my tips, so you disagree with me! ; )

I know it's totally personal. I was with a friend last night who took a cell phone picture and was mighty proud of how it turned out even though I reprimanded her. It was a pretty dish ...

iEatDC said...

I'd really prefer to have a professional food photographer follow me around all day. Then I wouldn't have to curse myself for forgetting my camera AGAIN while eating one of my very favorite (undocumented) lunches.

Anonymous said...

It all depends on the venue. If I'm eating a $5 footlong Meatball Marinara at Subway, I find the industrial-grade fluorescent lighting to be a bit harsh. In these conditions, the hazy grain of a cameraphone really takes the edge off and delivers a much more appetizing shot.

But when I'm enjoying all-you-can-eat breadsticks and a never-ending pasta bowl at Olive Garden with my Italian Grandfather, the softer, more intimate lighting necessitates the clarity and focus of my ELPH.

Just my $.02!